Directory - Features

The Times Review Directory is a great way to promote your business and get you in front of new customers.

Enhanced


$49.95/month

Basic


Free
Features
Promote your business to a highly targeted audience
Directory listing with your logo and important business information
Reliable and spam free email leads
Category classification for easy searching and filtering
"Mini-site" - A full page dedicated to your business
  • Search Engine Optimization (SEO) fueled by Times Review's millions of page views
  • Tailored to highlight your business by our web marketing experts
  • Dynamic maps and directions to your business right on the page
  • Social sharing via Facebook, Twitter, StumbleUpon, etc...
Listing appears first on Directory homepage and search results
Upgraded style treatment to call more attention to your listing
 
Shelter Island Reporter | Official town newspaper of Shelter Island.
Featured Story
11/21/14 10:00am
REPORTER FILE PHOTO The Center Post Office.

REPORTER FILE PHOTO
The Center Post Office.

CPF debate
To the Editor:
Last Friday I spoke before the Town Board and voiced my concern about sharing the revenues from the CPF real estate transfer tax between purchasing of development rights and open space with water quality initiatives. Thanks to The Reporter for covering our discussion in the online article, “Resident: Don’t change Community Preservation Fund.” (more…)

Featured Story
11/21/14 8:00am
BEVERLEA WALZ PHOTO Staffer Anna Belle and owner Marie Eiffel of Reddings are more than ready for Thanksgiving.

BEVERLEA WALZ PHOTO
Staffer Anna Belle and owner Marie Eiffel of Reddings are more than ready for Thanksgiving.

There are a number of chefs on the Island willing to cook your Thanksgiving dinner or provide side dishes and desserts. But only one — Ram’s Head Inn — is ready to welcome you to its dining room for that special holiday meal. (more…)

11/20/14 2:00pm

 

COURTESY PHOTO

COURTESY PHOTO

For several centuries, Hindu teaching encouraged Indian widows to immolate themselves on the funeral pyres of their husbands. It was considered an act of piety. The practice was called Sati or suttee. It was outlawed by the British Raj in 1829. But Sati, named for the Hindu goddess of marital happiness and longevity, persisted well into the 20th century. As many as several hundred women a year hurled themselves onto their dead husbands’ funeral pyres. Two hundred and fifty Sati temples glorified the practice.

(more…)